Reflecting on ICEP Vietnam / ICEPベトナムを振り返って-五嶋みどり

Reflecting on ICEP Vietnam

by Midori

 

After a fortnight of being back in the US, enjoying my self-prepared chicken paprikash and quinoa, I have a chance finally to reflect a bit on the past two weeks in Vietnam. Our stay in Hanoi started with much peace and quiet time to concentrate on our work. The musicians were getting to know each other and learning to collaborate with each other.

 

I was once before in Hanoi over a decade ago for the first ICEP tour, and I still cannot get over how the city has changed, while at the same time, I remember certain characteristics as if my last visit had been just yesterday. Immediately upon hitting the road from the airport to center city, we were amidst a swirl of motorbikes and cars, but these days the bikers all were wearing helmets. The traffic seemed congested but was always moving. The roads were in excellent condition, and I quickly reacquainted myself with the art of crossing the busy streets without traffic lights. (There are now some streets with traffic lights, but the lights are only somewhat heeded, at most.) The street up to the Conservatory, now called the Viet Nam National Academy of Music, felt comfortably familiar, and as I quickly felt relaxed walking in close proximity with the cars and the motorbikes zipping by, I would hum whatever we had been rehearsing that day. The streets showed a large South Korean influence, from shops and banks, to other businesses, and I must confess that I enjoyed sitting and feeling chic after a long day in a stylish café, now found almost anywhere in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh.

 

On our first evening in Vietnam, the Vietnamese national team won the ASEAN Football Federation Championship (AFF Suzuki Cup), and Hanoi went wild. With honking, chanting, and shouting, the euphoric mood of the nation over the win was a one-of-a-kind experience of pandemonium one would find in any sports-enthusiastic country in a similar victory.

 

Our trips to Thai Binh and Tuyen Quang Provinces gave us a glimpse of life outside of the urban bustle. I particularly enjoyed conversations during those visits, whether with women and young girls through the work of IFAD, or with sanatorium residents with a terminal illness or a mental disability. Again, I was impressed by the technological advances and the much-improved road conditions. Staying in a guest house out in the country, in the middle of the mountains, surrounded by the beauty of nature and rustic conditions, sharing meals with the locals as we toasted for the health and the prosperity of everyone present, then coming back to my mattress for the night and catching a few minutes of the daily international news on the internet as I dozed off, offered a dissonance of the expected and the unexpected.

 

We then went on to Ho Chi Minh, meeting more young people, and during our little free time, trekked amidst skyscrapers and fashionable shops, trying to find in vain bargain (non-American-priced) Vietnamese coffee and pho, without too much success. Perhaps Ho Chi Minh was the wrong city for that…what we did find were out-of-this-world in taste but not as friendly to the wallet as one might have expected. We marveled at the beautiful French-influenced architecture, while accustoming ourselves to sudden outpourings of storm that would bring severe darkness to the skies, trendy bars and restaurants. We particularly noted how Beethoven was turned into a marketing ploy for an instant coffee of a café conglomerate where the non-instant latte was truly fabulous. (No offense to Beethoven, but I was not interested in trying his endorsement!)

 

My overall impression was that many more people now have opportunities to think about quality of life in general.  In our visits to schools and youth centers, we met with people who seemed to be very open, motivated in life, and confident. English speaking amongst the young population felt much more comfortable and at-ease. Most children were much more eager with English than their caretakers or teachers. Yet, we also met those who, through no fault of their own were irrevocably disabled in one manner or another, and therefore marginalized. And it is from them, I was again reminded, that we learn true meaning of courage, to live a life from what is given, and to aspire to reach a higher place.

 

ICEPベトナムを振り返って

五嶋みどり

アメリカに戻って、自宅で調理したチキンパプリカとキヌアを味わっていると、ようやく、ベトナムでの2週間を振り返る余裕が出てきました。私たちのハノイ滞在は、リハーサルに集中するには申し分のない、平穏で静かな時間とともに始まりました。そこで演奏家たちはお互いを知り、共に音楽を作り上げることを学んでいきました。

ハノイには10年以上前、初めてのICEPで一度訪れています。街の変わりようには驚くばかりですが、前回の訪問がつい昨日のことのように思い出されます。空港から中心街へ向かう道にさしかかると、すぐにバイクと自動車の渦に飲み込まれましたが、今日では皆きちんとヘルメットを着用してバイクに乗っていました。道路は混雑しているように見えても、車の流れが止まることはありません。交通はしっかりと機能していました。このときに思い出したのですが、ベトナムでは信号機なしで混雑した道路をスイスイと通り抜けていく技術が要るのです(今日では信号機のある道路もありますが、あくまで目安に過ぎません)。ベトナム国立音楽院へ続く道は、いつもの通りやすい道でした。車やバイクが抜けていくのを横目に落ち着いて歩くことができると感じたときは、その日にリハーサルした曲は何でもハミングで歌いたくなるような気分でした。街の通りは、お店や銀行などに韓国の影響が大きく表れていました。今日ではハノイやホーチミンのあちこちにスタイリッシュなカフェが出店しています。長い一日の後は、私もそんなカフェの一席でオシャレな気分を堪能していたことを打ち明けましょう。

ベトナムで最初の夜は、ベトナム代表チームが東南アジアサッカー選手権(AFFスズキカップ)で優勝したというので、ハノイはものすごい騒ぎになっていました。クラクション、応援歌、叫び声…。国中が勝利に沸く様子は、スポーツに熱狂的な国でよく見られる大混乱ぶりでした。

タイビン省とトゥエンクアン省を訪れ、都会の喧騒から離れた生活の様子を垣間見ることもできました。IFADの仕事を通じて出会った女性や少女、また、療養所で暮らす末期患者や精神障がいの方々との会話は勉強になりました。ここでも、技術の進歩やよく整備された道路が印象的でした。自然の美しさに囲まれた山間の村のゲストハウスに宿泊し、地元の人々と一緒に食事をして皆の健康と繁栄に乾杯し、夜は布団に入ってウトウトしながら国際ニュースに目を通す、それは私の期待していることとそうでないことの不協和音を感じさせました。

その後はホーチミンに行き、たくさんの若い人たちと出会いました。わずかな自由時間で、私たちは高層ビルやオシャレなブティックに囲まれる中、お得な(アメリカ価格でない)ベトナムコーヒーとフォーを探して歩きましたが、あまり期待通りにはいきませんでした。きっとホーチミンはそういう街ではないのでしょう…面白いものはたくさんありましたが、お財布には優しくありませんでした。市内の美しいフランス建築には驚きましたが、流行のバーやレストラン、空、すべてを暗闇で覆う突然の大雨にもたびたび驚きました。でも特筆すべきは、あるカフェチェーンのインスタントコーヒー販売戦略にベートーヴェンが使用されていたことでしょうか。そのお店のインスタントでないカフェラテは本当に美味しかったのですが。(もちろんベートーヴェンが馬鹿にされているわけではありません。でも、彼の名前が試されているようで私には面白くなかったのです!)

ICEPベトナムの全体的な印象として、現在ではより多くの人々が生活の質について考える機会があると感じました。学校や青年クラブで出会った人たちは、とても心が広く、向上心と自信に満ち溢れているように見えました。若い人たちは英語で話すことにあまり抵抗を感じていません。子どもたちも、彼らの面倒を見るスタッフや先生たちに比べ、はるかに英語に熱心でした。また、自分は悪くないのに障がいを持ってしまい、社会的に弱い立場に置かれている人たちにも出会いました。彼らから学んだことは、現状を受け入れた上で、より前向きな人生を目指すという、勇気の本当の意味です。

 

Advertisements